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The Mint and the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation reveal new Indigenous keepsake

Royal Canadian Mint’s new keepsake coin represents truth of residential school system
The Royal Canadian Mint in Winnipeg unveiled a new keepsake design on Thursday ahead of the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. The artwork on the coins was created in partnership with the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation and is an expression of Indigenous culture. – Sep 22, 2022

The Mint and the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation have come out with a symbolic keepsake that acknowledges the impact of residential schools.

The keepsake coin features imagery designed by Indigenous artists Leticia Spence (First Nations), Jason Sikoak (Inuit), JD Hawk (Métis) along with residential school survivors.

Royal Canadian Mint commemorates National Day for Truth and Reconciliation
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One side of the keepsake contains cultural aspects of the First Nations, Inuit and Métis. The other side bears the message “EVERY CHILD MATTERS” in English and French with orange-coloured hands forming the shape of a sun.

“September and the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation is a moment for the country to pause, reflect, and remember the children who never came home from residential school and those still with us today,” said Stephanie Scott, Executive Director of the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation.

“People in Canada can now honour those children and survivors with this keepsake, and support the healing journeys of our communities through the Na-mi-quai-ni-mak Community Support Fund.”

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Royal Canadian Mint President and CEO Marie Lemay said Mint employees were proud to have worked on the project.

“We are deeply touched by the work of the First Nations, Inuit and Métis artists that Canadians can proudly display as they wear the keepsake to help bring the truth of residential schools to light and encourage fellow Canadians to join the journey towards reconciliation.”

According to the release, proceeds from the keepsake will go to the Na-mi-quai-ni-mak (NA-MEH-QWAY-NIM-MACK) Community Support Fund.

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